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Fact of the day
How Monet drowned his painting
Certainly, the great artist did not do it on purpose. During his voyage to Etretat, a place in Normandy with the most beautiful cliffs in France, Monet was fascinated by the views. So much so that, carried away by his work, he did not notice how the tide began. The water came so quickly that the artist himself almost died, but the almost completed landscape had no chance to survive, it drowned in the risen water. However, Monet made up with the landscapes. As recalled Guy de Maupassant who saw him then: "I often followed Claude Monet when he wandered around searching impression. In those moments, he seemed to be not an artist, but a real hunter. He always had 5 or 6 canvases with him, carried by pleasured local children... He took one or another canvas, according to the changing conditions. Sometimes the artist waited for a long time for suitable weather."
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$12,000.00
XXI century, 12×12 cm
280,000.00 ₽
280,000.00 ₽
100,000.00 ₽
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Negotiable
9,000.00 ₽
2019, 24×30 cm
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1912, 55×46 cm