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Top 10 Most Famous Works by Sandro Botticelli

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In this article on Arthive, you will learn about 10 of the most famous paintings by the Italian artist Sandro Botticelli. Read the reports and reviews of the authors of Arthive.
Top 10 Most Famous Works by Sandro Botticelli

Top 10 Most Famous Works by Sandro Botticelli

Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli, was an Italian painter during the 1470s and had gained a reputation as the master of the Italian renaissance
The Renaissance is the period that began around the 14th century and ended at the late 16th century, traditionally associated primarily with the Italian region. The ideas and images of the Renaissance largely determined the aesthetic ideals of modern man, his sense of harmony, measure and beauty. Read more
. He has produced several controversial, beautiful and eloquent paintings throughout his lifetime. Further mentioned here, you will find some of Sandro Botticelli’s famous paintings.

The Birth of Venus, 1485

This is one of the most famous paintings by Sandro Botticelli and demarks the Italian renaissance
The Renaissance is the period that began around the 14th century and ended at the late 16th century, traditionally associated primarily with the Italian region. The ideas and images of the Renaissance largely determined the aesthetic ideals of modern man, his sense of harmony, measure and beauty. Read more
. The composition of ‘The Birth of Venus' has an underlying meaning to it.
It shows the goddess of love Venus, arriving on the island of Cyprus. She is born from the sea spray and blown there by the winds, perhaps Zephyr and Aura. The goddess is shown standing on a humongous scallop shell, denoting her being as pure as a pearl.
On the other side, she is met by a woman holding a cloak covered with flowers, who is identified as either Hora of Spring or one of the Graces
The Birth of Venus, 1485
The Birth of Venus, 1485

Allegory of Fortitude, 1470

In another one of Botticelli’s famous paintings is a young woman wearing armour over a very gracefully drawn dress. She also holds a ruler’s sceptre, denoting perseverance and strength in the pursuit of goodness. She is depicted as one of the four cardinal human virtues.
This panel was the only one painted by Sandro Botticelli in the series of paintings dedicated to such virtues. This series was mainly made for the Tribunal Hall of Piazza Della Signoria in Florence. It is now placed in the Uffizi Galleries.
The body of the young woman seen in this painting is supple and long, while the face has a rather melancholic and unenergetic expression. This was a characteristic feature in most of Bottilcelli’s female figures.
Allegory of Fortitude, 1470
Allegory of Fortitude, 1470

Adoration of the Magi, 1476

On display at Uffizi in Florence, this famous painting by Italian Renaissance
The Renaissance is the period that began around the 14th century and ended at the late 16th century, traditionally associated primarily with the Italian region. The ideas and images of the Renaissance largely determined the aesthetic ideals of modern man, his sense of harmony, measure and beauty. Read more
master Sandro Botticelli dates back to 1475 or a year later. The painter was commissioned to paint at least 7 versions of this painting.
However, the most popular version was commissioned by Gaspare di Zanobi Del Lama for one of his funerary chapels located in Santa Maria Novella. This painting portrays a lot of characters. Among the several characters here, most of them are a member of the Medici family.
The three Medici members depicted as Magi in this picture were all dead at the time of painting, and Florence was being ruled by Lorenzo.
Adoration of the Magi, 1476
Adoration of the Magi, 1476

Temptations of Christ, 1482

Know to be one of Botticelli’s famous works, this painting has an interesting back story to it. In the latter part of the year 1480, Botticelli and some other Florentine painters started their journey for Rome. He had been called there as a part of the reconciliation project between Pope Sixtus IV and the de facto ruler of Florence, Lorenzo de Medici.
This painting essentially shows three episodes from the gospels, painted right opposite to the Trails of Moses, another painting by Botticelli. In one, fasting and a rather unhealthy Christ is being tempted by the Devil, asking him to turn stones into bread.
The second scene shows the Devil carrying Jesus to the top of a temple in Jerusalem. Here the Devil tempts Christ to challenge God’s promise of being protected by the angels by throwing himself down.
The third temptation shows the Devil with Jesus on high mountains, showing the beauties of Earth. The Devil further promises him power only if he bows down to the Devil and denies God. However, Jesus finally sends away the Devil and remains under the guidance of angels.
Temptations of Christ, 1482
Temptations of Christ, 1482

Mars and Venus, 1483

This panel painting is one of Sandro Botticelli’s most famous paintings. Painted around 1485, it portrays the Roman Gods Mars, the God of war and Venus, of love, in a metaphor of valor and beauty.
The picture shows this young couple reclining in a forest setting, surrounded by rather playful baby satyrs. The painting was most probably made to commemorate a wedding. It was intended to be set in a piece of furniture or panelling in the bedroom of the bride and groom.
This was possibly a part of several similar works. Art critics were really astonished and please by such paintings and saw them as the ideal depiction of sensuous love. It is most likely that Botticelli first worked on the concept of the painting and later finalized it with the help of Poliziano, a Renaissance Humanist scholar and Medici house poet.
Mars and Venus, 1483
Mars and Venus, 1483

La primavera, 1478

One of Sandro Botticelli’s famous works in the late 1470s, this painting is one of the most written and talked about in the world. This is also considered to be a very well-known and celebrated painting in Western art.
It shows a group of figures, typically from classic mythology, in a garden. However, there have been no stories that state why the group is brought together. Most critics will agree that this painting is a work of allegory that accounts for the lush growth during spring.
That being said, any knowledge of the exact meaning varies. The subject, however, got described as Primavera by Giorgio Vasari first, who was also a historian. He saw it during 1550, at Villa Castello, near Florence.
La primavera, 1478
La primavera, 1478

Map of Hell, 1480

More commonly known as ‘The Abyss of Hell', this painting was made by Botticelli to illustrate editing of Dante Aligheri’s poem ‘The Divine Comedy'.
This painting mainly shows a geographic representation of hell in the classical funnel section, which was then later picked up in iconography. Painted sometime between 1480 and 1490, this painting was done using the silvertip technique.
Map of Hell, 1480
Map of Hell, 1480

The Mystical Nativity, 1500

By far one of the most famous paintings by Botticelli, this painting is now for the show in the National Gallery in London. It was done using oil paints and is the only work that had been signed by him. This has a rather unusual iconography to it.
It is believed that this painting was connected to the influence of Girolamo Savonarola, who had inspired quite a few later works of Botticelli. However, the contents of this painting were later associated with the person who commissioned it.
It uses a medieval representation of the Virgin Mary and an infant Jesus, which are larger than all the other figures present, and the surrounding environment as well. This was done intentionally for more effects and has not been seen in any of the early works of Botticelli.
The Mystical Nativity, 1500
The Mystical Nativity, 1500

Madonna of the Magnificat, 1481

This painting is said to be Botticelli’s most famous painting and was done in a rather unusual way. It was done in circular form and is also referred to as the ‘Virgin and Child with Five Angels'. In the painting, you will see Virgin Mary writing the Magnificat with the right hand and a pomegranate in her left.
Two other angels in the background are trying to crown her, with an infant Jesus on her lap. Three other angels on her left can be seen crowding the Magnificat, said to be in deep conversation with each other. This painting is located in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence now.
Madonna of the Magnificat, 1481
Madonna of the Magnificat, 1481

Mystic Crucifixion, 1497

Although this painting has been damaged beyond repair now, it used to be one of Botticelli’s most famous paintings. It shows Jesus on a cross in a white field. There is Mary Magdalene, one of his disciples under it, almost staring with a wild gaze.
Underneath her red gown, you can see a creature trying to run. Although the destroyed state of the picture does not allow you to recognize the creature, it could be interpreted as a wolf or a fox. On the opposite side, you can see an angel standing in white cloth, striking a dead lion with the sword.
Mystic Crucifixion, 1497
Mystic Crucifixion, 1497