On their official website, the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation announced the publication of the fifth and last section of the Catalogue Raisonné of paintings by Salvador Dalí. The register is presented in a new design, and its final section encompasses the period from 1965 to 1983. It took 17 years of intensive research and analysis to compile the entire inventory.

Such a catalog is important, first of all, because Salvador Dalí is among the most forged artists in the world, due in no small way to himself.



Salvador Dali. Moses and Pharaoh
Moses and Pharaoh
Salvador Dali
1966, 108×95.3 cm

Dalí is known to have signed a lot of blank paper sheets, which were later used to increase the print run of his works, mostly paintings. According to some information, there were hundreds of thousands of them (although some art critics mention smaller numbers). Identification is made more difficult by the fact that the artist did not have a single signature, he wrote his name in dozens of variants. He did not consider signature something important for identification.
Salvador Dali. Gala Nude looking at the sea which at a distance of 18 metres in transformirovalsya portrait of Abraham Lincoln
Gala Nude looking at the sea which at a distance of 18 metres in transformirovalsya portrait of Abraham Lincoln
Salvador Dali
1975, 445×350 cm
The most forged lithography is "Lincoln in Dalivision" ("Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea which at Twenty Meters Becomes the Portrait of Abraham Lincoln") from a limited edition. Dalí painted two original canvases in 1975 and in 1976 (now one is in his Theatre-Museum in Figueres, the second is in his museum in St. Petersburg, Florida).

Left: Salvador Dalí, "Gala [...]Becomes the Portrait of Abraham Lincoln" (1975), Theater-Museum in Figueres


Among other pictures are "Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus)", "Metamorphosis of Narcissus" and "The Hallucinogenic Toreador".



1.1. Salvador Dalí, "The Hallucinogenic Toreador" (1970). Salvador Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida
1.2. Salvador Dalí, «The oil sketch×A study is an exercise painting that helps the painter better understand the object he or she paints. It is simple and clear, like sample letters in a school student’s copybook. Rough and ready, not detailed, with every stroke being to the point, a study is a proven method of touching the world and making a catalogue of it. However, in art history, the status of the study is vague and open to interpretation. Despite its auxiliary role, a study is sometimes viewed as something far more significant than the finished piece. Then, within an impressive frame, it is placed on a museum wall.
So, when does a study remain a mere drill, and when can we call it an artwork in its own right, full of life and having artistic value? read more
for 'The Hallucinogenic Toreador"» (1969). Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation, Figueres
Salvador Dali. Metamorphosis Of Narcissus
Metamorphosis Of Narcissus
Salvador Dali
1937, 51.1×78.1 cm

In addition, Dalí himself declared some of his own works to be fakes. "The picture is good, the signature is good, but the work is a fake," he told the French publisher Jean-Paul Delcourt after he had reviewed several of his prints. And he explained, "They did not pay Dalí."


Salvador Dali. The crucifixion. Giperbolicheskoi body
The crucifixion. Giperbolicheskoi body
Salvador Dali
1954, 195×124 cm
The online catalogue presented by the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation is an attribution project, determining the works' authorship. It is conceived as a work-in-progress, continuously updated and expanded with new data. The authors' aim is to establish beyond doubt the works that belong to Dalí's output as an artist, produced between 1910 and 1983.

The final fifth part, as already mentioned, is dedicated to the last eighteen years of Salvador Dalí's career (he stopped working in 1983 and died six years later). The rubric includes 233 paintings. In just 17 years, scientists have unequivocally identified the authorship of a thousand works. However, it should be clarified that some of the paintings are composed of two elements, as for example, the stereoscopic paintings and, thus, should be treated as one.

Left: Salvador Dalí, "Crucifixion (Corpus Hypercubus)" (1954). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


The catalogue is freely available in Catalan, Spanish, English and French.


A screenshot of the page with information about the "Portrait of Fortuny (Character Masquerading in Pinning Up a Butterfly)", 1965. In addition to the name of the picture, its size, technique and materials, it contains data on its provenance, exhibition history and bibliography.


The Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation accentuates the new web site design, which "looks for a balance between the content and the graphic elements to create a pleasant experience for the user". The developers are sure that fans and researchers "will easily apprehend the artistic evolution of the painter". Specialists emphasize that the catalogue raisonné of Dalí's paintings is not only a contribution to a better knowledge of the artist's work, but also "important tool for the study×A study is an exercise painting that helps the painter better understand the object he or she paints. It is simple and clear, like sample letters in a school student’s copybook. Rough and ready, not detailed, with every stroke being to the point, a study is a proven method of touching the world and making a catalogue of it. However, in art history, the status of the study is vague and open to interpretation. Despite its auxiliary role, a study is sometimes viewed as something far more significant than the finished piece. Then, within an impressive frame, it is placed on a museum wall.
So, when does a study remain a mere drill, and when can we call it an artwork in its own right, full of life and having artistic value? read more
of the 20th century history of art, for the general audiences and also for international researchers
".
Salvador Dali. Dali, with his back turned, painting a portrait of Gala, his back turned and is perpetuated in six virtual roguishly temporarily reflected in six mirrors
Dali, with his back turned, painting a portrait of Gala, his back turned and is perpetuated in six virtual roguishly temporarily reflected in six mirrors
Salvador Dali
1973, 60×60 cm

"For the owners of paintings and for the general art market, the inclusion of a work within this catalogue is guarantee of its authenticity," the web site says.



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Based on the materials of the official site of the Gala-Salvador Dalí Foundation, Artdaily.com and other sources