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Miles Aldridge, the “King of Colour” in Gloss

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Some call him a genius, a king of colour, a master of Surrealism, and some accuse him of exploiting female sexuality and voyeurism. Miles Aldridge is a famous fashion photographer who has created covers for Vogue, The New York Times and many other publications. Miles' works are unique with bright colours, carefully thought-out scenery and a clear sense of cinematic narrative.
Miles Aldridge, the “King of Colour” in Gloss
Aldridge was first recognized in the mid-1990s for his lavish mise-en-scène, full of acid and eroticism. Inspired by noir films, art history, pop culture and Alfred Hitchcock’s work capable of making ordinary things sinister and strange, these fascinating images explore hidden currents in society — idealized family life, beauty and sexuality.
Miles Aldridge, the “King of Colour” in Gloss
Aldridge’s art is built in keepingwith Surrealism
Avant-garde is how modern art critics refer the general trend of new artistic directions that arose in world art at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. A very thin line separates it from the concept of “modernism”. Read more
Surrealism (Fr. surréalisme) is an avant-garde art movement of the first half of the twentieth century characterized by the fusion of reality with something else, but not oppositional. Surrealism is a dream which is neither real, nor surreal. The style is characterized by allusions and a paradoxical combination of forms, visual deception. In the paintings of the Surrealists hard objects and rocks often melt, and the water, on the contrary, hardens. Read more
and contains a mix of components: something everyday, both glamorous and erotic. Plus, a very personal life story: a life spent among exemplary sisters, a successful but wayward illustrator father, and a charming but suffering mother. The photographer uses his lens to construct a graphic, deep world of dreams, completely focused on his passion for the "secrets" of women; "I am the very best person to take my pictures," says Aldridge.
Miles Aldridge, the “King of Colour” in Gloss
Aldridge himself says that he looks at women with a fascinated male gaze, because, firstly, in addition to his mother, he has been close to famous women all his life, and secondly, when he looks at women, he immediately tries to compose fictional stories around them. In this he is inspired by films, Blue Velvet by Lynch, paintings by Fellini, Almodóvar.

Miles has notable commercial works, such as a short video for the Glenmorangie Scotch brand. Aldridge managed to keep his corporate style: a lot of interesting details in each frame
It has always been important for artists and art collectors how to frame their works of art. We can paraphrase Shakespeare and say,

“What’s in a frame? That which we call a picture
In an improper frame will look less nice.”

Or, perhaps, the picture’s message will be obscured by too ornate or too plain framing. Here, we present a retrospective journey into the history of framing and its evolution, with illustrations and an expert’s commentary. Read more
, rich exaggerated colours complementing the cool soundtrack of British soul singer Michael Kiwanuka, which you could hear at the beginning of the Big Little Lies series.
Miles Aldridge, the “King of Colour” in Gloss
In all his works, Miles leaves a mystery and believes that the power of the image is in a secret that is necessary to intrigue the viewer. This work is no exception: in it, Miles also hid his ‘Easter eggs'. For example, Glenmorangie anagrams: Mango reeling (frame
It has always been important for artists and art collectors how to frame their works of art. We can paraphrase Shakespeare and say,

“What’s in a frame? That which we call a picture
In an improper frame will look less nice.”

Or, perhaps, the picture’s message will be obscured by too ornate or too plain framing. Here, we present a retrospective journey into the history of framing and its evolution, with illustrations and an expert’s commentary. Read more
with two houses), Ginger Lemon on the train, Longer Enigma (the name of the magazine in the bathroom)… There are also other similar moments — we leave them for your observation!
Perhaps in this work, Miles Aldridge managed to dramatically change the typical perception of whiskey advertising and create something new, truly unique.